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Alcoholics Anonymous

How Alcoholics Anonymous Started


The community of Alcoholics Anonymous has been providing great support and healing for recovering alcoholics for nearly 80 years. The group was founded by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith who are both recovering alcoholics in 1935, it began as a community-based fellowship in order to encourage sobriety in many recovering alcoholics. There are 12 traditions that were put in place to help define the reason for the group's existence but first, the famous 12 steps were introduced to help give the meetings some direction. Many people that have recovered from alcoholism always have something positive to say about the group and the help they were accorded.


There are over 50,000 recovering alcoholics that are part of Alcoholics Anonymous group in the country and over 2 million around the globe.


What To Expect From Attending An Aa Meeting

It is always quite challenging the first time you go for the meeting if you are not aware of what goes on there. This is to be expected because the meetings involve telling people whom you've probably never met that you're an addict and that you need assistance. Fortunately, every participant within AA is fully aware about how the other feels. AA was founded by recovering alcohol addicts and its model has remained till today. For recovering alcoholics, AA provides a special environment where they can open up and not feel judged because every person involved was an alcoholic at some point.


New members are made to feel comfortable They are encouraged to join the conversations though no one will force them. AA has the understanding that a number of people cannot be comfortable with sharing their intimate details during the initial visits to the organisation. In the course of time, most of the attendees realise great healing power of the open honest debating at these meetings.


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Difference Between Closed And Open Meetings

Only the people that are struggling with alcohol addiction are the ones allowed to attend the closed meetings in AA.

The family and people close to the recovering alcoholic are allowed to attend the open meetings. The beauty with AA is that they allow you to choose any meeting you wish to attend. For some people, it is preferable to separate their normal lives from their recovery. For others, the love and support of friends and family members during meetings is important.


The 12 Steps Of Aa

The 12 steps were first started in Alcoholics Anonymous but is used in addiction recovery groups for many other drugs nowadays. Though steps are taught to one leading to the next (linear), the members experience them as a circle of events. A patient may repeat a particular step until they are certified with the results.

The initial step requires an alcoholic to admit that he or she has a problem and needs help to overcome the same. Further steps include the following: making a firm decision to quit; admitting all your wrongs to yourself and others; making amends for all wrongdoings; and commitment to permanent improvement. You can read more about the 12 steps here.


Reasons For Not Going To Aa Meetings

Some people do not want to attend the gatherings because of excuses. Some of the common oppositions which people have in mind are:

  • They don't see if they'll get the assistance they need
  • The guilt of meeting familiar faces
  • They haven't yet accepted they are addicts and need help

Rather than concentrate on the excuses despite having a feeling that they are enormous people who are nervous about attending a meeting should focus on the reasons why they are considering this organisation in the first place.

At the end of the day, if you believe there's a problem with your drinking, you are right. There will be no harm for you if you go to a meeting; besides, it can potentially save you from years of suffering caused by your addiction.


Identifying An Alcoholics Anonymous Group

Regardless of where you are living you will not have any difficulties in finding an AA group within the locality. It's easy to attend these meetings because the groups tend to meet up regularly. Choose the kind of a meeting you want to attend - a closed or open one - and in what area, and you will be able to find a group online using our meeting finder. Let us provide you the help to find an AA group today please contact 0800 246 1509.