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Talk To Frank

More Regarding Talk To Frank

The longest running anti-drug campaign in the UK is Talk to Frank. Has it managed to get people to quit substance abuse?

A police Swat team in the UK burst into a kitchen of a quiet suburban home, and the results were a complete turnaround of the way drug education was done for good. People were seriously warned to stay away from the drug peddlers around sports arenas and that they could be destroyed by drugs. In came the quirky funny side and a light-hearted attitude.


The first advert featured a boy calling the police snatch squad on his mother because she wanted to discuss drugs with him. There was also a new message: Drugs are illegal. Talking about the isn't. So talk to Frank."


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. To become a familiar brand with youth in the UK, the Frank label has presented everything from the adventures of pablo the drug mule to a tour of a brain warehouse.


The agency behind Frank has said that it was crucial that Frank was never actually seen so he could never be the target of ridicule for wearing the wrong thing or trying to be cool. Surprisingly, the funny imitations of the Frank videos found on YouTube are quite polite. As there is nothing that remotely suggests Frank is a government project, the campaign is viewed as a first occurrence funded by the government.

Drugs instruction has progressed significantly since Nancy Reagan, and in the UK, the cast of Grange Hill asked adolescents to "Simply Say No" to drugs, a movement which numerous specialists now considers was counterproductive.


The majority of the advertisements in Europe currently concentrate, like Frank, on attempting to share objective info to assist youngsters to make their own choices. There are still images of prison cells and hurt parents being presented in countries that have strong penalties for drugs possession. One late battle in Singapore told youthful clubbers: "You play, you pay."

Above the Influence, which is an ad that has lasted for a very long time to encourage young people to seek for alternatives to drugs, and which has gulped the UK government some huge amount of money combine caution and humour. In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. Though, an unexpected number of anti-drug campaigns all over the globe still resort back to strategies intended to arouse fear or alarm, specifically the substance-fuelled plunge to hell. One typical example was a part of the Canadian DrugsNot4Me program showed an attractive, confident young woman then into a wasting, hollow eyes shadow at the hand of drugs.

Ads that reveal the dangers of drug abuse mostly push frustrated people into experimenting with drugs, according to a data from the anti-drugs campaign of the UK from 1999 to 2004.


The opposition Conservative politicians were initially against Frank, simply because it pointed out the ups and downs of drug use, but it made giant strides.


An early online advertisement told people that cocaine made you feel on of the world.

It was not generally simple to get the balance of the message accurate. Matt Powell was the creative director of digital agency Profero, the company that came up with the cocaine ad; he now thinks he miscalculated the time an average user spends on browsing the internet. Some might not have adhered around to the finish of the liveliness to get some answers concerning the negative impacts. The idea behind the ad according to Powell is to make the Frank brand a more honest one by being sincere to teenagers about drugs.

According to the Home Office, 67% of younger people in a survey stated that they would ask Frank if they required advice on drugs. In 2011 and 2012, Frank received 225,892 calls and 3,341,777 visits to the website. For him, this shows that the campaign is very successful.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

Drug usage in the UK has gone around 9% in the decade since the conflict propelled, yet specialists say quite a bit of this is down to a decrease in cannabis utilization, potentially connected to changing states of mind towards smoking tobacco among youngsters.


What Is Frank?

FRANK was launched in 2003 as a collaborated effort of the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government as a national drug education service. It's main aim is to inform young people about the dangers of alcohol and drugs, so as to bring down the rate of consumption of both legal and illegal drugs. It has run numerous media promotions on radio and the web.


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Services

FRANK has the following resources for anyone looking for information about drugs:

  • A website
  • A confidential telephone number, available 24 hours a day
  • Email
  • A confidential live chat every day from 2 pm - 6 pm
  • A facility to find counselling besides management