Schedule: Monday - Sunday - 00:00 - 24:00

Learn About Al-Anon

Al-Anon History

A family of support groups for people that have been affected by the problem of alcoholism within their family is identified as Al-Anon. The aim of these groups is to be recuperative and curative.


Al-Anon was founded in 1951 with the aim of providing support for those affected by alcohol abuse by loved ones. This organization was founded by Lois Wilson, who is also popular by the name of Lois W and Al Anon came into being 16 years after the formation of Alcoholics Anonymous [AA] by her husband. She formed an organization for people similar to her, after confronting the hardships of assisting a recovering alcoholic in her own life. Al-Anon thrives through the contributions of its members. There are meetings available through the assistance of family members and friends of alcoholics to cope with and better serve the interests of their loved ones even if they are in different stages of recovery.


The fight against alcoholism is a joint undertaking and that is the objective of this support group.


Alcoholism Is A Family Illness

The people close to the alcoholic person are also affected in one way or the other and Al-Anon seeks to help them also overcome the challenge they might be facing. A clear-cut system of friends and family members support is an integral part of recovery from alcoholism.

Helping the addict recuperate should be the main concern of the family members and the friends. Support meetings can help deal about these issues in the best way while also making members understand that alcoholism should be treated as a family illness.


Alateen- Al-Anon Meetings For Teenagers

Teens are also affected by alcoholism and that is why Alateen was formed within Al-Anon to help them.

During the Al-teen meetings, the youth meet with their peers and share experiences and support each other at their level.


Why Join An Al-Anon Group

Members of Al-Anon benefit from being introduced to a number of people and families who could have suffered from the problem of alcoholism. All members have worked through some issues though the details may differ. The main benefit of Al-Anon is having an opportunity to find and talk with individuals who's had similar experiences. Al-Anon meetings are held throughout the nation. Contact us on 0800 246 1509 for assistance in locating a group near you.


What You Should Anticipate From A Meeting

Al-Anon gatherings are friends and family members of alcoholic addicts. You can get all the help required if you are being affected by the drinking behaviour of a person you know.

The outcomes of these meetings is what scares some people from coming. When thinking of attending a meeting, some things should be kept in mind:

  • Al-Anon is a group that is unidentified
  • Everybody present in each meeting has faced the problem of alcoholism, either personally or has a family member suffering from it
  • No One is made to speak about their problem or discuss it, just encouraged to
  • These Meetings Are Of Different Types
  • You may find some more beneficial to you than others.
  • Al-Anon is not an organization which is based on any religion
  • The 12 recovery steps are followed in this group

The meetings conducted by Al-Anon have a simple formula which gives the attendees the option of taking what they prefer and leaving behind the rest. The members get to go about their own personal experiences.


Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Al-Anon And The Twelve Steps

Usually, meetings start with someone reading from the 12 step program. These twelve steps are an abridged, almost verbatim, quote from the same-name program of Alcoholics Anonymous. Al-Anon members start with a sponsor who assists them work through the steps and who is ready for help in times of difficulty, mostly similar to AA. The steps are as follows:

  • We admitted we were powerless over alcohol that our lives had become unmanageable.
  • Members learn to accept alcoholism as a disease they cannot control in others.
  • Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  • members also learn they are driving themselves crazy by trying to change or control another person.
  • After admitting that they are powerless they begin to understand the fact that they can be brought back to sanity.
  • Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood him.
  • It is important that members learn to let go.
  • Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  • A huge part of the steps are self-discovery, and this is the beginning of the procedure.
  • They then come up with how they have been affected by the condition and what they might have done to hurt others or themselves.
  • Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  • Permitting them to dig into each issue, this is an examination of every thing in the members moral inventory.
  • Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  • This is an important step because it comes after accepting in full that the recovery process is supported by a greater power.
  • Humbly ask him to remove our shortcomings.
  • This part of the 12 steps provides members with the assistance needed to understand how they may have been exercising control or being judgmental towards an addict and how these actions are counterproductive.
  • Made a list of all persons we had harmed and be willing to make amends with them.
  • Most often making amends begins with yourself.
  • Sometimes it not always your fault a person is addicted.
  • They must learn to forgive and make it right for themselves.
  • Made amends to such people directly where feasible, except for the cases when doing so is likely to hurt them or others.
  • After you are willing to make amends, the following step is to act on it.
  • Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  • Passing through these twelve Steps is a time-consuming process.
  • Even if the members have already completed their inventory, missteps are normal.
  • Step 10 identifies this is an ongoing process.
  • Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious effort with god as we understood him praying only for the knowledge of his will and the power to carry that out.
  • This step is a personal, spiritual one; it comprises acceptance and comfort in view of the great stress of recovery.
  • Having experienced a spiritual awakening thanks to these steps, we tried to spread the word to other people, and to always practice these principles.
  • The last step is a realization that the members journey has not finished.
  • Encouragement is provided to members to support other members with their education.

Learning About The Higher Power

Members recognise there is a spiritual power that helps them to recover. The "higher power" or God is according to each person's perception of whom they consider Him to be. Al-Anon gladly accepts members from all religious traditions and denominations; nobody is forced to alter their beliefs here.